Posted in High School:


October 19th, 2021

2021-2022 Federal Impact Aid Survey Will Be Released October 20

On October 20, parents and guardians of CMCSS will receive an electronic Federal Impact Aid survey.

Federal Impact Aid is designed to assist local school districts that have lost property tax revenue due to tax-exempt Federal property. Federal Impact Aid is set up for school districts where federally owned lands (such as Fort Campbell, government buildings, TVA steam plants, subsidized housing, etc.) are located. It intends to help offset the lost property taxes that would have been collected if businesses or privately owned residences were located there instead. Federal Impact Aid does not provide funding for every military-dependent child who is served in our school system.

Each year, the Clarksville-Montgomery County School System sends out to parents a survey to collect data about federally connected students. The funding formula that determines how much money a school system will receive hinges on accurate information collected on the survey.

It is crucial that parents complete the forms. And the information must be what is accurate on November 2. This year, there will be an electronic survey that is confidential and has no effect on personal taxes or on those who live in subsidized housing.

Please complete the survey by November 12, 2021.


October 4th, 2021

Volunteer as an Educational Surrogate Parent for a Student with Disabilities

Caring individuals always make a difference in the lives of CMCSS students. The district is actively seeking community members who are able to represent the educational interests of students with disabilities.

All children with disabilities are entitled to a free and appropriate public education (FAPE) under state and federal special education laws. Included in these laws is a mandate for the parents of children with disabilities to have the opportunity to actively participate in the educational decision-making process. Some children with disabilities may not have parents who can fulfill this very important role, leaving their educational planning solely to representatives from their local school system or other agencies. Federal law, Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), and state rules, regulations and minimum standards require that an individual must be appointed to make decisions regarding the education students with disabilities must receive.

What is a surrogate parent?

A surrogate parent is a volunteer who is appointed by a local education agency to assist children who do not have parents or family members. The surrogate parent has all of the rights and can make all of the special education or early intervention decisions that are usually made by the child’s parents. Surrogate parents can review educational records; request and consent to evaluations and reevaluations; and challenge the recommendations of the education or early intervention agency by requesting informal and formal dispute resolution procedures. A surrogate parent does not have any rights and responsibilities for the child outside of the special education process.

When does a child require a surrogate parent?

A child with a disability requires a surrogate when:

  1. the parent (as defined in § 300.519) or guardian cannot be identified;
  2. the LEA, after reasonable efforts, cannot discover the whereabouts of a parent;
  3. the child is a ward of the State; or
  4. the child is an unaccompanied homeless youth as defined in section 725 (6) of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 11434a(6).

What are the responsibilities of a surrogate parent?

The surrogate parent acts as a substitute parent and is given the responsibility of determining the child’s educational experiences. A surrogate parent is not responsible for any financial costs or direct care of the child with disabilities. The surrogate parent represents the child in every step of the education process including identification, evaluation, and educational placement. The Surrogate Parent fulfills the parent role at all Individualized Education Plan (IEP) Team meetings and works to ensure that the child receives FAPE. A surrogate parent is also responsible for keeping confidential all information from the child’s educational, medical, or social services records.

Who can be a surrogate?

Any citizen of the United States of permanent resident who is at least 18 years old and has no conflict of interest concerning the child’s education may serve as an educational surrogate and must be of good moral character. The educational surrogate must act in the best interest of the student he/she represents. Furthermore, an educational surrogate may not be an employee of a public agency providing care, custody, or educational services to the specific child in need of educational surrogate representation.

How much time and money will this commitment take?

Surrogate parents are required to devote approximately three hours to the training provided by Clarksville Montgomery County Schools at least annually. After a student with disabilities is assigned, the educational surrogate reviews the student’s record well enough to understand the student’s needs, strengths, interests as well as their school history. Training is provided free of charge.

If you are interested in attending a training to become a surrogate parent, please email [email protected].


September 21st, 2021

Nationwide Food and Supply Shortages Impact Cafeteria Menus

The CMCSS Child Nutrition Department is being impacted by nationwide food and supply shortages. These shortages are creating unavoidable, last-minute menu changes and modifications to the serving trays and utensils. Menu selections may be further limited or altered. However, please know that students will continue to receive a free breakfast and a free lunch this school year. We appreciate your patience and understanding as we navigate these shortages.

Contact your student’s cafeteria manager with any questions regarding the school menu. For more information about Food Services, visit the Child Nutrition employee page.

 

Update September 29, 2021

During the September 28 CMCSS School Board meeting, Dr. Angela Huff, Interim Director of Schools addressed the board with information concerning the current supply shortage situation. In her remarks, Dr. Huff mentioned the following:

  • Nationwide, high-volume shortages and supply chain disruptions are creating unavoidable, last-minute menu changes and modifications to serving trays and utensils. However, please note that complete, USDA-approved meals are still being served every day at no charge to students.
  • With the shortages, non-conventional meal tray replacements are being implemented such as bagging all items without a tray. Menu selections may be unconventional, such as sides not matching traditionally with entrees or hamburger/hotdog buns being replaced with flatbreads, wraps, or crackers.
  • Although the Child Nutrition Department has contracts with vendors, they are continuously exploring alternative suppliers and options. A major issue is that many vendors are not taking on new high-volume customers as they work to supply their current customers. For some, sourcing can be as simple as going to Kroger if Publix is out something they need. The District serves over 150,000 meals a week, so sourcing locally is generally not a viable option.
  • The Child Nutrition Department will continue navigating the supply chain disruptions and shortages that have been making national headlines to ensure our students continue to be served USDA-approved meals each school day.
  • As a reminder, CMCSS is not the agency which supplies P-EBT cards. The Tennessee Department of Human Services oversees the pandemic food benefits program.

May 19th, 2021

CMCSS 2021-2022 In-Person Learning Health and Safety Overview

CMCSS has communicated with families since last year that schools cannot eliminate the spread of COVID-19 during in-person learning, but our collective actions can help mitigate the spread. The District’s COVID-19 mitigation strategy has always been about using multiple layers to improve success, sometimes referred to as the Swiss Cheese model. For the 2021-2022 school year, CMCSS has been using the following primary mitigation layers:

  • Using MERV 13 instead of MERV 9 filters in all buildings
  • Increasing outdoor air ventilation
  • Employing enhanced two-step cleaning throughout buildings
  • Encouraging self-screening, masks, handwashing, covering sneezes, and staying home when sick for all students, employees, and visitors
  • Identifying opportunities to promote physical distancing when possible in schools
  • Replenishing hand sanitizing stations
  • Promoting the use of personal water bottles and filling stations while water fountains are shut down
  • Establishing School Health Screening Rooms
  • Providing vaccination opportunities and COVID-19 testing for employees and their families at Onsite Employee Health and Wellness Clinics
  • Updating and implementing the Return to School/Work Flowchart

To add more layers to CMCSS’ mitigation strategy, effective Monday, August 23, the following protocols will take effect until Montgomery County goes back down to moderate/low transmission levels:

  • Modifying custodial procedures to further increase the focus on two-step cleaning throughout the day and decrease focus on other areas (window cleaning, floor buffing, etc.)
  • Operating mechanical systems (HVAC) 24 hours a day, 7 days a week as possible for each building’s situation to further increase filtration
  • Limiting nonessential visitors from the school environment at the discretion of building administrators, to include temporarily not allowing lunchtime visitors
  • Limiting indoor mass gatherings during the school day at the discretion of building administrators
  • Providing masks in school buildings and on transportation for those who request one
  • Increasing hand sanitizing stations in schools and on transportation

COVID-19 Exposure Response Plan

When a CMCSS student or CMCSS employee tests positive for COVID-19, they will need to notify either the school nurse (if they are a student) or their supervisor (if they are an employee). The medical office that performed the test will notify the Montgomery County Health Department for contact tracing. 

Click here for the current CMCSS Return to Work/School Flowchart developed by the CMCSS Safety and Health Department in collaboration with the Montgomery County Health Department. For the Spanish version, click here.

Events/Athletics Capacity

CMCSS will return to normal capacity for after-school events, meetings, and athletics for the 2021-2022 school year. CMCSS will continue following TSSAA’s guidelines for athletics. The district will keep families informed as guidelines are updated throughout the year.

Face Masks

Face masks are strongly encouraged for students, employees, and visitors inside buildings and on transportation. Families are encouraged to use their judgment on sending their student(s) to school with a mask and make whatever decision will be best for the health of their child(ren) or other members of their household. For more information from the CDC on the use of cloth face coverings to help slow the spread of COVID-19, click here

Self-Screening

Employees will be expected to self-screen before entering school premises.

Self-screening protocols for students and visitors will continue. Families are strongly encouraged to engage in self-screening at home prior to each school day. Click here for updated guidance from the CDC regarding screening K-12 students for symptoms of COVID-19.

Self-Screening Protocol

Have you had any of the below symptoms as a new-onset in the past 72 hours? (This does not include chronic conditions)

  • fever of 100 degrees or greater
  • new onset of a cough
  • new onset of shortness of breath
  • new onset of sore throat
  • new onset of body aches
  • diarrhea
  • new onset of headache
  • new onset of loss of taste or smell
  • nausea or vomiting
  • congestion or runny nose
  • chills
  • fatigue

If “yes”, please consult your personal health care provider before returning to any CMCSS locations. Students, employees, and visitors who are sick must follow the CMCSS Flowchart.

Water Fountains

Water fountains will be closed during the 2021-2022 school year. Water filling stations will be open where available. Students should bring their own water bottles. 

Effective June 1, 2021; Updated Aug. 20, 2021. Subject to change based on updated guidance and local, state, or national recommendations or mandates.

Ell 6-12 March 18th, 2021

How to Access Student Report Cards

CMCSS student report cards for the third nine weeks of the 2020-21 school year will be available on Monday, March 22. For CMCSS students in grades 1-12, parents/guardians will access report cards online using the CMCSS Parent Self-Service webpage at parents.cmcss.net. For students in kindergarten, teachers will send parents/guardians standards-based report cards.

If parents/guardians have issues accessing their child’s report card using CMCSS Parent Self-Service, they can contact their child’s enrolled school.

At any time, parents/guardians can check their student’s academic progress on PowerSchool. PowerSchool is the official grade book and attendance tracker for CMCSS. While some digital learning platforms do have a grade book, please note that official grades will only be recorded in PowerSchool.

If you need to create a PowerSchool account, visit www.powerschool.cmcss.net, click the Create Account tab, and complete the form. If you do not know the Access ID for your child(ren), please contact your child(ren)’s school(s). If using the PowerSchool app, CMCSS’ District Code is P Z Q N.


Substitute Positions January 26th, 2021

CMCSS Opens Applications for Teacher Residency Programs

Applications are now open for the Teacher Residency Programs within the Clarksville-Montgomery County School System. The programs allow community members, current CMCSS employees, and high school seniors a non-traditional approach to becoming a teacher.

“It’s about investing in your own community with an apprenticeship approach to developing teachers,” stated Dr. Sean Impeartrice, Chief Academic Officer for CMCSS.

Residents work towards their licensure, degree, and/or certification while gaining first-hand experience as an Educational Assistant within the Clarksville-Montgomery County School System. This experience provides instructional and non-instructional support to students while learning best practices for a career in education from a certified CMCSS educator.

Now in its third year of the program, CMCSS has partnered with several colleges and universities in the surrounding area, including Austin Peay State University, Nashville State Community College, and Lipscomb University. Residents incur no expenses for tuition or textbooks.

“We are proactively addressing the national teacher shortage,” said Dr. Phyllis Casebolt, Director of Federal Projects, including the Teacher Residency Programs. “These programs provide residents an opportunity to work with high-performing teachers while completing the requirements to earn a teaching license.  Wrap-around supports are in place to ensure the academic success of the residents.  Our district recognizes the positive impact of employees committed to meeting the needs of all students.”

There are three teacher residency pathways available for the 2021-2022 school year: Early-Learning Teacher Residency in partnership with Nashville State Community College and Austin Peay State University, Lipscomb Teacher Residency, and Lipscomb Middle Teacher Residency in partnership with Lipscomb University.

Applications for community members are due February 10, 2021. High School seniors must submit their applications by March 5, 2021. All applications and required paperwork can be found on the district website, www.cmcss.net/trp.

“I’ve always had a passion for teaching since I was little. This was an excellent opportunity that I could not pass up,” said Ms. Raquel Blackley, a Teacher Resident who is currently serving at West Creek Elementary School.

Each program’s eligibility criteria and requirements can be found on the district website, www.cmcss.net/trp, along with videos and links to frequently asked questions. For more information, email the Teacher Pipeline Facilitators at [email protected].


January 14th, 2021

2021 FAFSA Deadline Extended to March 1

Information provided by the TN Board of Regents (https://bit.ly/38Gqst5)

High school seniors and college students applying for the Tennessee Promise scholarship and Tennessee Student Assistance Award programs have an extra month to file their FAFSA application this year.

Due to conditions surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic, the Tennessee Higher Education Commission/Tennessee Student Assistance Corporation extended the Tennessee Promise FAFSA deadline and the priority FAFSA deadline for the Tennessee Student Assistance Award from Feb. 1 to March 1 of this year.

The extension is in effect for high school seniors applying for the first time and for students already receiving the assistance. Students participating in the Tennessee Promise scholarship program must file a FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid), or renewal FAFSA, each year to remain eligible. For more information, see the Tennessee Promise website.

The College System of Tennessee is the state’s largest public higher education system, with 13 community colleges, 27 colleges of applied technology, and the online TN eCampus serving approximately 140,000 students. The system is governed by the Tennessee Board of Regents.


November 5th, 2020

Col. (Ret.) Vernon F. Lightner named CMCSS’ Director of Army Instruction

Col. (retired) Vernon F. Lightner has been named CMCSS’ Director of Army Instruction, replacing Col. (retired) Michael J. Taliento, Jr. who is retiring. Previously, he served as the Senior Army Instructor at Montgomery Central High School. Before teaching JROTC, he served in the U.S. Army for 27 years, retiring as a Colonel.

Col. (retired) Lightner has served in a variety of leadership positions from Platoon Leader to Battalion Commander. He has participated in several operational deployments including Operation Intrinsic Action, Kuwait; Operation Restore Hope, Somalia; and two tours in support of Operation Enduring Freedom, Afghanistan. His awards and decorations include the Legion of Merit Medal, Bronze Star Medal, Defense Meritorious Service Medal, Meritorious Service Medal, Army Commendation Medal, Joint Service Achievement Medal, Army Achievement Medal, Combat Action Badge, Parachutist Badge, the Air Assault Badge, the Joint Staff and Army Staff Badge, and various other campaign medals.

He earned his M.S. in National Security and Resource Strategy from the Dwight D. Eisenhower School at National Defense University in Washington, D.C., an M.S. in Public Administration from Central Michigan University, and a B.S. in Business Administration from Livingstone College in Salisbury, N.C. Additionally, he completed the Military Police Officer Basic and Advanced Courses, the Combined Arms Services Staff School, and the Command and General Staff College.

Colonel (retired) Lightner is married to Colonel (retired) Cynthia Lightner, and they have three adult children.


October 9th, 2020

TNPromise Scholarship Applications Due Nov. 2, 2020

CLARKSVILLE, Tenn. (October 7, 2020) – tnAchieves, the local partnering organization for TN Promise, which provides two years of tuition-free attendance at a community or technical college in Tennessee, is looking for both high school applicants and mentors to assist seniors in pursuing higher education. In Clarksville-Montgomery County, both the number of students who have applied for the scholarship and the adult mentors has seen a significant drop in 2020. 

TNPromise Applicants

The deadline for high school seniors submitting a TN Promise application is November 2, 2020. Due to disruptions related to the COVID-19 pandemic, most Tennessee high schools are significantly behind last year’s TN Promise application rate. High school seniors who are interested should complete the TN Promise application, submit a FAFSA, and apply to a college.

Tennessee high school seniors can submit a TN Promise application by visiting www.TNPromise.gov and applying online.

As indicated, the scholarship will provide two years of tuition-free attendance at a community or technical college in Tennessee. Tennessee Promise is a last-dollar scholarship, meaning it will cover the cost of tuition and mandatory fees not met by Pell, Hope, or the Tennessee Student Assistance Award. As part of the program, students will be paired with a partnering organization, provided with a mentor who will support them during the college application process and complete the community service requirement. 

Mentor a High School Senior

tnAchieves, the local partnering organization for TN Promise, needs volunteers to serve as mentors for the Class of 2021. tnAchieves mentors will serve their community virtually, working with local students to offer support throughout the college-going process.

TN Promise allows any graduating high school senior the opportunity to attend a community or technical college tuition and mandatory fee-free. Many of the students will be the first in their family to attend college and may also need some additional, non-financial support. tnAchieves provides this support by pairing each scholarship applicant with a volunteer mentor. The program needs more than 9,000 mentors across the state!

tnAchieves mentors spend about one hour per month working with a group of students to help them achieve their college-going goals. In 2021, mentors will serve their students using tnAchieves CONNECT. tnAchieves CONNECT is a new virtual mentoring tool that allows mentors to remain connected to their students in a safe, online environment. It will also enable mentors to serve from their home and on their schedule!

Mentors remind students of important deadlines, serve as a trusted college resource and, most importantly, encourage students to reach their full potential. While the time commitment is small, the impact on the students can be life-changing. To learn more and apply, you can visit www.tnachieves.org/mentors/apply or contact Tyler Ford at [email protected] or (309) 945-3446


September 15th, 2020

No Cost Curbside Meals, Free and Reduced Meal Application

As a reminder, the USDA approved for CMCSS to continue serving free breakfast and lunch meals to all children 18 and under, as the district has since March. The USDA stated that these free meals will be available through December 2020, or until funds run out. No information has been made available beyond December 2020. 

 Meals are available for all children 18 and under in Montgomery County, including students in CMCSS K-12 Virtual, students enrolled in traditional, and children not enrolled in CMCSS schools.

Traditional students may receive a free breakfast and lunch each school day, inside their school building, as part of their regular day. 

CMCSS K-12 Virtual students and children not enrolled in a CMCSS school may pick up meals curbside. All curbside meals will be available at the closest elementary school beginning Friday, September 18. Curbside meals will no longer be available for pick-up at any middle or high school locations. Families with multiple children can pick-up all meals in one location. 

Weekday meals are available Mondays from 1 – 2 p.m. for CMCSS K-12 Virtual and non-enrolled children, 18-years-old and under, at all CMCSS elementary schools. 

Weekend meals are available Fridays from 1 – 2 p.m. for CMCSS K-12 Virtual, traditional students, and non-enrolled children, 18-years-old and under, at all CMCSS elementary schools. 

Children are not required to be present for curbside pick-up. The person picking up meals will need to provide the name of the child(ren) not present. 

Although pre-payment for meals will not be needed, if a student wants to purchase any items available outside of the free meal served in the cafeteria, funds will need to be applied to his/her account. Parents/guardians can preload funds on a student’s account at www.schoolcafe.com. This is the preferred and fastest way to add funds. Or, families may mail a check in advance to the cafeteria at their student’s enrolled school. No payments will be accepted curbside. Funds already applied to a student’s account can remain on the account for use when this program ends.

It is currently expected that the breakfast and lunch meals will be provided to students free of charge through December of 2020, this could potentially end earlier if funding for the free meals from the Federal Government runs out prior to the end of December 2020. Once the free meal program ends, each student’s meal eligibility status will take effect at that time, and a cost will be associated with each meal purchased unless the student receives an approved free meal eligibility status. A student’s eligibility status will change to paid status if an approved application is not on file and approved by Wednesday, October 21, 2020, at 4:30 pm. Please remember that parents or guardians are responsible for charge balances on their student’s account. 

As a reminder, the grace period for the Free and Reduced Meal Program will end on Wednesday, October 21. If you feel that your child qualifies for free and reduced meal benefits, and you have not filled out a free/reduced application for this school year, or you have not received a letter stating that your child is on the program for this school year, you will need to fill out an application. For a quicker application method, you can go to the online application at www.schoolcafe.com. If you choose to have a paper application, they are available at your child’s school or at Central Office.

For questions regarding Free and Reduced Meal Applications, contact [email protected]